All Intellectual Outputs

Building a culture of student voice in schools through collaboration

  • Enhance student voice in post-primary schools in Ireland
  • Provide opportunities to deepen capacity and commitment of teachers to working in partnerships with students
  • Provide opportunities to deepen capacity and commitment of system leaders to support the development of a culture of student voice in and between schools

In this model participants are enabled to reflect on their understanding of and commitment to student voice. They identify their respective starting points, appropriate to their context, and are supported in moving towards an enhanced culture of student voice. This model supports the different stakeholders to work in partnership, mindful of their individual and collective roles in this area.

Model Nr.: 
02

Developing partnership between students and teachers based on trust and mutual respect

The aim of this model is to show how students can be engaged actively in teaching and learning process according to the student voice principles by creating more open and trustful relationships between teacher and students. When given a voice, students feel their views are valued and are much more motivated to co-construct learning experiences and assessment. In that way, students are stimulated to think about their own learning and   take greater responsibility for their learning; consequently, they increasingly take ownership of their learning.

Model Nr.: 
03

Developing Student Voice through Model United Nations

This model exemplifies how a secondary school in East Lothian Council, Scotland (North Berwick High School) engaged with the Model United Nations programme to support the development of confident and articulate student voices. It explores both the process and the impact and can be replicated in other school contexts.

 

These model aims to:

 

Deepen understanding of how pupil voice can be implemented in high schools

Provide specific examples of pupil leadership

Highlight how teaching staff and pupils can work together to promote and facilitate pupil voice in schools

Model Nr.: 
05

Exemplar of Practice: Activating Student Voice in Health and Wellbeing

This model exemplifies how a secondary school in Scotland (North Berwick High School, East Lothian Council) set up a pupil Health and Well-being committee to activate student voice in this area.  It explores both the process and the impact and can be replicated in other school contexts.

 

The overview which follows aims to:

 

Deepen understanding of how pupil voice can be implemented in high schools

Provide specific examples of pupil leadership

Highlight how teaching staff and pupils can work together to promote and facilitate pupil voice in schools

Model Nr.: 
10

An example approach to developing a School Leadership Team

This is a model of practice developed in one Scottish secondary school in East Lothian Council, (Ross High School) where the teachers and pupils established a Junior Leadership Team with the aim of creating a forum for pupils to support driving school improvement.   This model provides an example of practice and talks through the process undertaken by the school.

 

Since 2015, Pupil ‘Leadership of Learning’ has played a significant part of the School Improvement Plan (SIP).

The vision for the Junior Leadership Team (JLT)  at Ross High School was to develop skills for future life and work whilst creating an ethos and environment that provides pupils with the opportunity to lead their learning.

Moving in line with ‘How Good is Your School? 4 (HGIOS?4) which states that all students should play an active role in their school and wider community and regularly take on leadership roles, including leading their learning (Education Scotland, ‘How Good Is Your School? 4, pg 22-23, 2015). It was felt that more could be done to develop a 'pupil voice' which directly contributed to and focused on improving teaching and learning.

The National Improvement Framework (NIF) recognises that leadership is one of the most important aspects of the success of any school. Further commenting that Headteachers and Teachers who are empowered and empower others to take ownership of their own learning, have a strong track record of ensuring that the highest quality of learning and teaching (Scottish Government, ‘National Improvement Framework for Scottish Education - achieving excellence and equality’, January 2016)

Model Nr.: 
11